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Why Virtual Meetings?

 Robin Ward (with photos of Robin’s adorable kids) |  6 July 2017 |  Category: News 


By now you are likely aware of what’s known in the Virtual Meeting world as “The Big Three.” Or not, as I may have just made this up. But there are three primary drivers for considering changing your on-site meeting to virtual.

#1 Cost Savings
Executing meetings virtually can result in costs savings up to 95% of your onsite meeting budgets. Contact a MedPoint rep for an estimate on how much you can save.

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#2 Time Savings
Executing meetings virtually will shorten time spent out-of-office from as much as 2-3 days, to only 3-4 hours in-office.

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#3 Carbon Savings
Executing meetings virtually can save on average up to 2.38 metric tons of CO2 per person. Multiply that by the number of attendees and you’ve got the equivalent of planting a forest of trees. Give yourself an extra pat on the back for staying under budget, AND helping the environment! bill

BONUS #4 MedPoint Digital Executed Virtual Meetings
Executing virtual meetings with MedPoint Digital increases: attendance, attendee satisfaction and technical performance/experience. Don’t believe me, ask my kids.

Contact MedPoint to elevate your virtual meeting experience.

MedPoint Talks 2 – How We Build Better Technology

 MedPoint Digital |  19 April 2017 |  Category: News 


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Janice Nakashima, Technical Business Analyst, explains how MedPoint builds customized, secure, and responsive software to suit biopharma customers.


Microsoft Lauds MedPoint Digital as a Partner

 MedPoint Digital |  1 March 2017 |  Category: News 


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MedPoint Digital is proud to be recognized by Microsoft in a special report released on the Microsoft website, entitled “Software maker future-proofs products by developing in the cloud.” MedPoint has partnered with Microsoft to move its technology systems to Azure Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Microsoft’s most advanced cloud environment. Azure PaaS allows for more rapid innovation, better scalability, higher performance, and lower costs, ensuring MedPoint’s portal technology can continue to evolve with the biopharmaceutical industry. MedPoint has digitized key parts of the drug development and commercialization process, and Azure PaaS ensures that critical data, documents and resources are hosted in a highly secure, compliant environment. Using Azure PaaS, MedPoint’s newest technology, RegDoc eSafe™, will drive the ability of investigator sites to be truly paperless. To read the full report, click here.

Happy Holidays from all of us at MedPoint Digital!

 MedPoint Digital |  15 December 2016 |  Category: News 


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Wishing you a Warm, Wonderful Holiday Season and Much Joy in the New Year! Please take a moment to enjoy our 2016 Holiday Card, from your friends at MedPoint Digital.



Introducing the MedPoint Talks Video Series

 MedPoint Digital |  1 December 2016 |  Category: News 


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We talked with colleagues about what they do and what’s special about MedPoint Digital. Watch the MedPoint Talks series to hear short vignettes what’s new, different, better and fun around our shop. First up, Isabel Davis talks about the comprehensive services her team provides for Virtual Meetings.

MedPoint Digital Caps off a Series of Fall Pharma Conferences

 MedPoint Digital |  1 November 2016 |  Category: News 


MedPoint representatives have been traveling to clinical and digital pharmaceutical conference across the country this fall, featuring our new digital solutions for brand teams, study teams and study sites.



Outsourcing in Clinical Trials New England, September 6-7 – Boston

The fall season commenced with the New England venue of the OCT series, after stops at OCT events in San Francisco and Philadelphia earlier in 2016. At the Boston event, MedPoint rolled out a Metrics Center and SUSAR Center, two major new functions on the TriPort™ Trial Portal. “It was a lot of fun demonstrating the latest additions to TriPort,” reported Eric Jansen, VP Strategic Development, “They work beautifully and have clear value. Our clients who already use TriPort seemed especially happy that we continue to build out TriPort with features that streamline work between sponsors, CROs and sites.”


Disruptive Innovations in Clinical Trials, September 20-21 – Boston

The fall would not be the same without a return to this dynamic conference for a fifth straight year, where MedPoint CEO Bill Cooney presented at on “Paperless Study Sites and Virtual Monitoring.” He noted that, “Our mission is to empower the paperless study site using an exciting new technology, the Study eSafe™. As this platform enables sites to go paperless, it opens new possibilities for CRAs to effectively conduct site monitoring activities digitally and without travel to their sites.”


Global Site Solutions Summit, October 14-16 – Boca Raton, FL

Next, a four-person MedPoint team made the annual trek to Florida for the Site Summit, just missing Hurricane Matthew in mid-October. There we demonstrated the new RegDoc eSafe™ to hundreds of study site professionals, and the response to this innovative platform was positive and overwhelming. John Losch, Vice President, Site Services Group, summed things up, “It seems every study site is looking to go digital for their regulatory binders, but so far haven’t been thrilled with their options. We’re really pleased by the feedback from sites, that our platform is the easiest and most functional they’ve seen. The value is so clear that we even had several sites buy into RegDoc eSafe on the spot.”


Digital Pharma East, October 24-25 – Philadelphia

After participating in the West edition of Digital Pharma last spring, our Marketing Services team joined the East Coast digital in-crowd at this big industry event. There was a lot of excitement surrounding how emerging digital formats fit into multi-channel marketing, with MedPoint bringing to the mix its best-in-class Elevation™ live virtual speaker and Cirrus™ HCP portal platforms. Jenn Tontini, Director Strategic Development, shared her thoughts about the digital pharma industry’s future and special challenges. Watch the video here.


MAGI West, October 24-25 – Las Vegas

As one MedPoint team gathered in Philly, another team bravely headed to Las Vegas for MAGI West, an important clinical research event focused on study sites. We once again showcased RegDoc eSafe™, a new electronic regulatory binder system that’s validated, cloud-based and Part 11 compliant. “Sites really enjoyed clicking through eSafe and seeing how simple it is to use. They asked a lot of good questions and seem very pleased with the functionality. The consensus is, eSafe is a winner!” said Filip Matakovic, General Manager. He was joined in the exhibit space by John Losch, sporting regalia of their beloved home-town Chicago Cubs. (See below.)


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In an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), six authors made the case through a cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry payment data from the Open Payments Program that after measuring “Prescribing rates of promoted drugs compared with alternatives in the same class,” a conclusion could be reached that “Receipt of industry-sponsored meals was associated with an increased rate of prescribing the brand-name medication that was being promoted. The findings represent an association, not a cause-and-effect relationship.” (Colette DeJong, et al., 2016) This conclusion was reached through a cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry payment data from the Open Payments Program.

I make the argument that this JAMA article has all the trappings of a good, juicy reality-show drama: a villainous industry, cherry-picked data, and researchers positioning themselves as whistle blowers bringing attention to the unjust, unfair practice of promoting products to increase sales.

Let me share the subtext to the conclusion that the JAMA article makes: a poorly-designed cross-sectional analysis of incomplete data is the professional publication version of internet click bait.

Dear pharma: you don’t need to duck your heads or apologize. Educational programs, advertisements, and promotions are meant to EDUCATE, ADVERTISE, AND PROMOTE. The shaky suggestion that a modest meal being served while educational or promotional programs are being conducted is a slap in the face to the hard-working healthcare practitioners who spend their brief lunch times or evenings off-duty learning about medications and disease states to continue their accumulation of knowledge.

“No,” you shriek, “say it ain’t so! ADVERTISEMENT AND PROMOTIONS WORK? SPARE ME THE HORROR!”

At the end of the day, that’s what we’re reading in this article - that education, promotions, and advertisements work. We as a world believe in the power of education, hence, the proliferation of educational institutions and programs. And we KNOW promotions and advertisements work, right? It’s why companies pay millions of dollars for a spot during the Super Bowl, and how newspapers, magazines, and television are maintained as entertainment mediums.

So why should pharma be any different than any other for-profit industry?

Imagine you’re the creators of Xarelto. You spent many years and millions and millions of dollars in research and development to create just the right drug. The size. The shape. The color. The packaging. The marketing materials borne of years of market shaping and research. Millions and millions of dollars invested in this product, and you’re banking on it being a success. But how do you tell the world how amazing Xarelto is?

Promotions. Advertising. You get Arnold Palmer (he of the iced tea/lemonade cocktail and golf hall of fame, among other distinctions), to tell people that “I went to my doctor and he perscribed XARELTO. It fit my lifestyle very well.” You provide samples of your product so people can see how wonderful it is. You build your market share one dose at a time, until you’re the market leader. You get new indications tested and approved, and increase your marketing budget with the expectation that increased marketing will translate into increased sales. It’s an investment in the growth of your product line. (And also a lesson from Marketing 101.)

But, pharmaceutical products reach a patent cliff, and soon generic competition looms. A generics manufacturing company sees your success and decides to launch a competitive generic product. They’ve copied your product in just a few months, as they’ve been able to piggyback on your R&D, and haven’t had the expense of having to duplicate your marketing efforts. They haven’t had to work to educate your customers about how wonderful their product is; you’ve already done all the work. Why bother with advertising and promotions? They’ve simply worked with the same distributors that you’re using to offer a comparable product at a lower price. And it’s not 100 percent identical, but it has the same ingredients and is considered comparable. It’s a direct competitor for all of the customers you’ve worked to win over, and have been providing your product to without competition for all of these years.

Customers who are price-sensitive will immediately choose whichever option is comparable but less expensive. But the customers with whom you’ve connected, that have become loyal to your brand, will continue to buy Xarelto. They might even try the generic, but discover that by either objective appraisal (the color is different,) or subjective assessment (it just doesn’t feel right,) that they prefer Xarelto.

Let’s pretend that instead of Xarelto being a blockbuster medication, it’s a delicious nacho-cheese dusted tortilla chip.

Let’s call it a “Dorito.” (My apologies to Frito-Lay for dragging you into this argument.) You have a company that makes these “Doritos,” and spends many years and millions and millions of dollars in research and development to create just the right product. The size. The shape. The color. The packaging. The marketing materials borne of years of market shaping and research. Millions and millions of dollars invested in this product, and you’re banking on it being a success. But how do you tell the world how amazing “Doritos” are?

Promotions. Advertising. You get Jay Leno (he of the cleft chin and Tonight Show fame, among other notable rolesdistinctions,) to tell the world to, “Crunch all you want. We’ll make more.” You provide samples of your product so people can see how wonderful it is. You build your market share one chip at a time, until you’re the market leader. You get new indications flavors tested and approved and increase your marketing budget with the expectation that increased marketing will translate into increased sales. It’s an investment in the growth of your product line.

But a big box retailer sees your success and decides to launch a competitive generic product called Good Value brand Coritos. They’ve copied your product in just a few months, as they’ve been able to piggyback on your R&D, and haven’t had the expense of having to duplicate your marketing efforts. They haven’t had to work to educate your customers about how wonderful their product is; you’ve already done all the work. Why bother with advertising and promotions? They’ve simply worked with the same distributors that you’re using to offer a comparable product at a lower price. And it’s not 100 percent identical, but it has the same ingredients and is considered comparable. It’s a direct competitor for all of the customers you’ve worked to win over, and have been providing your product to without competition for all of these years. (Seeing any similarities yet?)

Customers who are price-sensitive will immediately choose whichever option is comparable but less expensive. But the customers with whom you’ve connected, that have become loyal to your brand, will continue to buy Doritos. They might even try Coritos, but discover that by either objective appraisal (the color is different,) or subjective assessment (it just doesn’t feel right,) that they prefer Doritos.

The difference between Doritos and Xarelto is that no one is giving Doritos the stink eye for out-promoting competitors. No one is crying foul that Doritos gives away samples and sponsor advertisements. No one is accusing Doritos of bribing customers by providing information about them and including a modest meal as a courtesy while customers were told about all the R&D and available information about Doritos, along with warnings that eating too many Doritos may lead to health issues. Wait, you weren’t given warnings about how excessive use of Doritos could lead to obesity? WHERE IS THE OVERSIGHT FOR THE LOOSELY REGULATED SNACK FOOD INDUSTRY?

It’s a ridiculous comparison, right? Almost as ridiculous as the article published in JAMA.

In a transparent, easily-diffused attack on the pharma industry. The easy conclusion of, “When doctors have the opportunity to learn about a product, and that product is part of their top-of-mind awareness, they’re more likely to prescribe that product,” was ignored in favor of lobbying for the agenda of the authors.

Where was the examination of the promotions without accompanying meals? Where within the analysis were citations of other exposures to branded and unbranded medications noted or tracked? Many different exposures contribute to the decision to write a prescription. If the authors can use the scientific method to positively identify the cause-and-effect relationship that one exposure to product education or marketing had on healthcare professionals’ prescribing habits, they’d better be prepared for a line out the door of Madison Avenue ad execs lusting after their secrets.

And here's a CRAZY notion: Maybe educational information and the dissemination of ideas from a group of their peers had a greater effect on their opinions and prescribing habits than any other marketing tactic. Let’s not draw the radical conclusion that eating a sandwich suddenly turned Dr. Smith into a Xarelto advocate. Don’t do healthcare professionals the disservice of insinuating that their key decisions are based on Panera instead of education. If we’re going to do a study, let’s make sure that all variables are taken into account, and not cherry-pick the ends that justify the authors’ means. Let’s give more credit to the healthcare professionals who work hard to make choices for their patients’ best interests, day in and day out.

And my personal experience leads me to believe that Doritos are better than Coritos. Would you like to know why? It’s one of the tools in a marketer’s bag of tricks that they call “peer influence.” My brother swears by Doritos, so I gave them a try, and now, they're my choice, too. Would you like to try a sample?

Read the entire JAMA article here.

This article has been edited from its first publication on the MedPoint Digital website in July 2016.

The Top 5 Ways to Ruin a Virtual Meeting Experience

 Jennifer Tontini and Sarah Nolan |  3 June 2016 |  Category: News 


Inexperienced Provider

1. Conducting Your Event on a Do-It-Yourself Platform

It sounds great in theory - by conducting the program yourself, the price will be much cheaper. You’ve participated in a web conference before and you’ve seen the webcasts of your competitors. How hard could it possibly be? You acquire a great KOL, recruit a large number of attendees, promote your program, and then execute. Except the execution of the plan goes awry; slides stop moving, the KOL’s audio is breaking up and eventually you’re 15 minutes behind schedule. It’s in this moment that you understand why people pay for full service solutions rather than taking the DIY route. Regardless of the extra cash in your pocket, a DIY platform will always lack the quality of a polished, professional program.

2. Creating a Didactic, Text-Heavy Presentation

You have a 30-slide deck for your 40-minute presentation, chock-full of data points and pertinent information you want your attendees to remember. To ensure they retain the information, you decide to write down all of the key points within the slides. 15 minutes are allotted for the Q&A portion at the end of your presentation delivery. You ask the group, “Are there any questions?” and hear crickets. No one responds. You ask again, and a charitable attendee responds, “No, no questions.”

The problem with a text-heavy approach is that it lulls the audience into a state of passive listening. If you do not actively engage the audience, their attention wanders and the important points of the presentation are lost, regardless of how interesting the subject matter is. An engaging presentation is key. Talk with your participants and ask open-ended questions for specific and valuable feedback. A dull presentation will benefit no one. For more information on creating an active Q&A session, check out our infographic, ‘5 Easy Tips to Create An Active Q&A Session’ and be sure to read Speaker University - Part 1.

3. Using a Technology-Averse KOL

The expertise that KOLs provide regarding specific drugs is essential to pharmaceutical companies attempting to establish a market for that specific drug. Companies need the legitimacy and feedback they provide in order to compete. However, the transition into the digital age of medicine has created a high demand for more tech savvy KOLs. Their aversion to technology creates a road block to a virtual meeting that could have taken place in a timely manner and at one-tenth of the cost. The position of technology, especially in the healthcare arena, plays a major role as a cost reducer.

4. Choosing a Virtual Meeting Provider Based Only on Price

When you have a budget in place, you want to make sure you’re getting the most value out of your dollar. One obvious solution might be to find the cheapest virtual meeting provider and in turn have more meetings. Sure, virtual meeting vendors are available anywhere now, but not all platforms are of the same quality. Be on the lookout for conferencing services that are very cheap, or claim to be ‘free’. They’re more likely to come with hidden fees and lack features a more expensive service would have, such as polling capability, structured text, open chat, higher quality video, slide builds, security, or even customer support. 

5. Choosing a Provider with Limited Virtual Meeting Experience 

A provider with limited virtual experience is a disaster waiting to happen. Sometimes a virtual meeting runs into difficulties; internet connection is lost, an attendee can’t get connected, audio and video capabilities have stopped working, etc. The list is endless. An inexperienced provider may not be technologically equipped to address the problem, or even worse they simply do not know how to fix it due to lack of experience. Be aware of your provider’s history of service. You want to be sure that they are capable of handling the meeting, especially one of a larger size. Technical problems lead to frustration and ultimately an unpleasant virtual meeting experience for your client, possibly making them less inclined to work with you in the future.

Avoiding Compliance Pitfalls in Onsite Events

 Jennifer Tontini |  1 April 2016 |  Category: News 


In light of the recent U.S. Attorney’s Office lawsuit alleging 80,000 Novartis doctor-education events were potentially violations to anti-kickback laws (read the story here,) now is a great time to take stock of what makes for a compliant, engaging educational program for HCPs, and what practices are taboo and can land your brand in hot water.

We’ve compiled some tips based on where Novartis went wrong to help you and your company stay compliant and avoid making costly (and potentially embarrassing) mistakes.

Strictly Business

A major issue with the Novartis programs being cited by the U.S. Attorney’s Office was the perceived lack of education being conducted at onsite programs, which were reported as company-sponsored educational events.

To tackle the glaringly obvious problem: TO BE A COMPANY-SPONSORED EDUCATIONAL EVENT, EDUCATION MUST BE CONDUCTED. Per the PhRMA Marketing Code, “…it is appropriate for occasional meals to be offered as a business courtesy to the healthcare professionals as well as members of their staff attending presentations, so long as the presentations provide scientific or educational value and the meals (a) are modest as judged by local standards; (b) are not part of an entertainment or recreational event; and (c) are provided in a manner conducive to informational communication.”

“But wait,” you say, “Shaking hands and kissing babies and creating relationships is all part of doing business!” Yes, you’re right, but I counter: your customer knows you didn’t invite them to dinner just because they’re a fantastic human being, and they expect that you’ll want to discuss your product at length. That’s how they learn about it, hence the term ‘educational event.’ So shake hands, kiss babies, create relationships, and then get down to the business at hand; discussing your product with your customer and educating them.

Location, Location, Location

The programs in question were onsite events, many involving dinners. While serving HCPs a meal does not in and of itself violate kickback laws, the location of a dinner program can make all the difference in whether that program is compliant. A venue doesn’t have to be a ‘dive’; on the contrary, a desirable venue is a must-have part of the recipe for a successful onsite event.

An instance where Novartis went wrong: Novartis is accused of hosting HCPs at the hip, exclusive Nobu restaurant. Posh eateries like Nobu might not necessarily cost substantially more than any other local sushi restaurant, but the perception of a venue as “trendy,” “exclusive,” or “expensive” raises regulatory eyebrows, and can get brands and companies into hot water. The PhRMA Marketing Code language around venue selection dictates that meals in conjunction with an educational program should be “modest as judged by local standards.” So pick a nice, modest, moderately-priced eatery with amazing food, and concerns around whether your venue is a potential violation will be non-existent.

When in Doubt, Ask Grandma

At the other end of the perception spectrum from venues like Nobu are the events that Novartis allegedly conducted at nice, not-so-modest, moderately-priced Hooters locations. (Insert head shake here.) Understand, this is not a critique of anyone’s life choices or personal preferences. As Grandma would say, there’s a time and a place for everything. While short shorts and hot wings have surely been conducive to many business deals, education is typically best undertaken without distraction. And therein lies the rub: business versus education. Kickback versus learning. See the difference?

Still not sure how to tell whether an event is compliant or conducive to educational programs sponsored by business? When in doubt, ask yourself, what would your grandmother say? (Not the cool Grandma; the other one, who is horrified that people wear jeans on airplanes instead of their Sunday best.)

Some good questions to ask when planning an onsite program:

  • Would most doctors hesitate to tell their patients they went to a program at the venue you’ve chosen?
  • Do you need a stack of $1 bills to tip the servers?
  • Is the venue loud/public/without a private event space, or does it reek of impropriety? (If “VIP Room” is the private space, please see the last section about “exclusive” spaces being taboo.)
  • If the answer to any of the above questions is “yes,” or Grandma says no, you need to start your venue search all over again.

Avoid the Issue

A great way to prevent compliance-related issues with onsite programs is to NOT conduct onsite programs outside of physician offices. I know, I know: brands love onsite programs, and there are HCPs who love them, too. But why? (And by the way, I’d LOVE to hear your thoughts on this question.)

Costs, logistics, compliance concerns, and HCPs wishing to avoid Open Payments Act reporting have made onsite programs a less attractive option for brands. Offering high-quality virtual meeting programs as educational programming, or offering continuous engagement opportunities through brand portals coupled with representative-requested on-demand virtual discussions can provide other avenues by which companies can interact with high-value HCPs and have fewer concerns about doing so in a compliant fashion.

Common Sense Prevails

So, in summary: Novartis is facing an uphill battle to explain how 80,000 onsite events don’t violate anti-kickback laws, which could have been easily avoided had the sponsoring parties simply used common sense and referenced the PhRMA Marketing Code.

You can help your company avoid these same missteps using the tips above as guide. Make sure you’re actually providing educational content, avoiding venues like Nobu and Hooters, and avoid the entire issue of onsite program perception issues by instead conducting virtual meetings or hosting HCPs through brand portals. When in doubt, use common sense and give any decisions the, “What would Grandma say?” test. Your compliance department (and likely your CEO,) will thank you.

MedPoint Completes Inaugural Bags 4 Kids Drive

 MedPoint Digital |  1 Febuary 2016 |  Category: News 


MedPoint Digital’s new Service Committee successfully completed its first donation drive on Friday, January 29 – Bags 4 Kids. Over the course of a week and a half, our colleagues collected 40 bags to deliver to the Association House of Chicago, a nonprofit organization which supports thousands of under-served families and children through child welfare, foster care, family programs and other services.

Often, when kids are removed from their homes and placed in foster care, they gather their possessions to transport them in a garbage bag. Bags 4 Kids aims to make this difficult situation a little more dignified for these children by providing alternative transport options. The Service Committee, comprised of Janice Nakashima, Isabel Davis-Velazquez and Martin Izaguirre, is pleased with the results of this first effort and hopes to hold several more drives this winter season.

MedPoint Digital Celebrates its 25th Anniversary!

 MedPoint Digital |  1 October 2015 |  Category: News 


On 1 October 2015, MedPoint Digital celebrated a milestone achievement: 25 years of service, excellence and innovation for leading biopharma companies. Over the last quarter-century, MedPoint has witnessed major shifts in the global biopharma industry and medical community, and has not only met many challenges, but thrived by embracing change.

In 1990 the company was founded as HealthPoint Communications, a medical education agency providing scientific content development, print design and production, and meeting logistics services. During the 1990s the firm established itself as a leading accredited provider of Continuing Medical Education courses to physicians in the U.S. In 1996 the company sold the name rights to “HealthPoint” to GlaxoWellcome and changed its name to MedPoint.

In 1992 the company became one of the first to develop computer-based and online training programs. It’s worth noting this was several years before most people knew the term “Internet.” In 1993 MedPoint became the first provider of virtual meeting technology in the medical industry, and was also an early pioneer in medical websites and custom computer programs for pharma sales reps.

The thirst for innovation continued to grow, and by the early 2000s almost all company services were in digital formats, so the company was rebranded as MedPoint Digital in 2011. In recent years, the rate of change has accelerated, and MedPoint has deployed a new generation of best-in-class technologies for clinical research and commercialization. Today the firm continues to embrace change in healthcare by evolving unprecedented digital solutions for global biopharma. Indeed, plans for the future perfectly reflect 25 years of history, and are summarized in a single word: Change.

Bill Cooney presents at Disruptive Innovations in Boston

 MedPoint Digital |  10 September 2015 |  Category: News 


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MedPoint Digital CEO Bill Cooney was a featured speaker at the Disruptive Innovations to Advance Clinical Trials conference in Boston on 10 Sep 2015. His presentation, Simplicity in Software, described MedPoint’s approach to developing technology that is powerful yet friendly to users. Bill reviewed the challenge of growing complexity in clinical trials, and stressed the need to develop site-centric technology, using input from investigator sites to design platforms that benefit sites, and that sites embrace. MedPoint’s TriPort™ Trial Portal was displayed to demonstrate the principles of simplicity in software, such as clean, consistent interfaces, stepwise functions, visualized data and personal dashboards.


DIA 2015 Editor's Take - MedPoint Digital

 MedPoint Digital |  16 June 2015 |  Category: News 


Bill Cooney discusses how studies are becoming digital, how this impacts clinical research subjects, and how the industry needs to adapt.

In this interview, Bill Cooney discusses the need for the clinical research community to consider the digital patient in the larger context of consumer and healthcare markets, where advances are more rapid and profound. In coming years, clinical research will be challenged merely to keep pace with how mobile devices, apps and cloud technology transform consumer behavior. To avoid falling far behind the expectations of digital patients, drug developers need to immediately start using apps and mobile devices in trials. Cooney points out the, while some sponsors are conducting pilots seeking to transform the paradigm for clinical trials, other sponsors can use new digital formats in safer, more modest ways, and should start doing so immediately.


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